Do You Suck as a Job Candidate? 5 Things Bad Candidates Do

November 2nd, 2017

By Aaron Walker, Toronto Technology Recruiter

We all want to be that superstar job candidate that companies are falling over to hire. We want to be able to choose between multiple job offers and have career options. But there is a reason why many candidates don’t – they simply are not good candidates. In fact, some of them suck as job candidates.

Do You Suck as a Job Candidate?

Bad job candidate

In a previous blog, Does Your Resume Suck?, we took a look at common traits of the worst resumes. Following a similar theme, this post takes a look at commonalities among bad job candidates:

No-showing for Job Interviews

No-showing for a job interview is not okay.  It shows a lack of respect for other people’s time. If you are not interested in an interview, don’t book it. We get it, things come up. If you cannot make the appointment, contact the hiring manager or recruiter as soon as possible so they can fill the time with another candidate.

Not Being Honest About Your Intentions

liar

Being completely upfront and honest about yourself as a candidate, your intentions, and career aspirations is important. However, many candidates continue to lie on their resumes about their skills and education. They also lie during interviews about their current salary, interest in the role and where they are in other interview processes. Be honest with yourself and with recruiters and hiring companies so everyone can effectively assess your fit for the role.

Not Being Prompt

No one likes to be left waiting. Being on time for phone interviews, job interviews and even a meeting with a recruiter is essential. Being late shows to companies that you don’t value the job opportunity as much as other candidates. It also shows you don’t value other people’s time.

“Going Dark” Halfway Through the Process

This is extremely frustrating for hiring companies. They put a lot of time and effort into identifying candidates and eliminating other candidates from contention. Going dark halfway through the process is unprofessional. If you are no longer interested in the role, which can happen, or if you have taken another offer, a simple email or phone call can go a long way. Communicating you are no longer interested allows the hiring company or recruiter to focus on other candidates.

Using an Offer to Get a Raise at Your Current Job

Leveraging another company and taking advantage of a job offer to get a raise with your current employer is bad form. When you do this, you are leading on the hiring company, wasting their time, and impacting their ability to hire another qualified candidate for the role.

If you do any of the above, please stop. You are only hurting your reputation as a job candidate, and it could come back to hurt you in the future.

More Job Search Advice

Does Your Resume Suck? 5 Traits of the Worst Resumes

Want to Get Hired at a Start-up? How to Position Yourself for the Gig Economy

How to Drop Out of a Job Interview Gracefully

 

IQ PARTNERS is an Executive Search & Recruitment firm supporting clients across the country. We help companies hire better, hire less & retain more. We have specialist teams of recruiters in Technology (IT), Accounting and Finance, Consumer Goods, eCommerce and Retail, Financial Services and Insurance, B2B and Industrial, Operations and HR, Professional Services and Legal, Media, Digital and Marketing, Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences, Emerging Technology and Telecom, and  Sales. IQ PARTNERS has its head office in Toronto and operates internationally via Aravati Global Search Network. Click here to view current job openings and to register with us.

Aaron Walker

Aaron is the IT Team Lead at IQ PARTNERS, utilizing his 12+ years of IT industry experience to connect the top CTOs, VPs, and Directors in the technology space with the most interesting and rewarding opportunities in the marketplace.